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Reviewsday: Joelle Charbonneau’s Dividing Eden

Having read Joelle Charbonneau's Testing series (which has a Hunger Games-esque vibe to it for all of you dystopian novel lovers!), I think I can safely say I was jumping up and down out of excitement when Dividing Eden popped up on my radar.

Reminiscent of The Crown's Game by Evelyn Skye, Dividing Eden tells the tale of twin royals, Carys and Andreus, pitted against each other in a battle for the crown after a disastrous accident leaves them with equal claim to the throne. Faced with a power hungry council watching their every move and faceless enemies stirring up trouble, the twins can only do what they've been doing their entire lives – stick together, watch each other's backs and, above all, protect the secret that's been haunting them since birth.

The novel was intriguing from the get go but I felt that Carys definitely emerges as the stronger lead throughout the book with Andreus' story taking a surprising turn that, whilst being beneficial to the plot line, was still a little tough to read through (if you find yourself shaking the book in frustration and wailing “Noooo!”, don't say I didn't warn you!). There a quite a few shady characters that appear in and around the castle which left me questioning almost everyone's motives. Even after finishing the book, I'm still suspicious as to who is really on which side.

Dividing Eden is truly an engrossing read – clear your calendar because you won't want to put it down until you've worked your way through all of the secrets, lies and manipulative madness that await you.

New Life for a Beloved Classic

When Margaret Atwood's dystopian novel The Handmaid's Tale was released in 1985, it was an immediate and visceral success. Thirty-two years later, the novel is even more terrifying and socially relevant today.

Set in the Republic of Gilead, a totalitarian theocracy that has overthrown the United States government, The Handmaid's Tale follows the story of Offred - a woman that is prized for her fertility in the same way horsebreeders value a winning horse. Offred is a Handmaid, a woman in indentured servitude to the Commander. She has one purpose only - to bear his healthy children (not as easy as one may think in this near future dystopia) and then to be assigned to her next household. But Offred is not a horse. she is a woman; she can remember a time before Gilead, her husband and young daughter, and perhaps more dangerously...she remembers her own name.

The Handmaid's Tale is a story of survival in the face of oppression, and the strength of the human condition despite all attempts to break it down. Readers today will no doubt identify just as strongly with Offred's plight as they did when the novel was first published. This is a must-read for any fan of thrilling dystopia, or someone just looking to remind themselves why our lives today are so precariously wonderful.

The Handmaid's Tale has just been adapted into a critically acclaimed HBO television series, but as always, there's nothing better than the book!

Reviewsday: 16th Seduction by James Patterson

James Patterson novels are like a rollercoaster - thrilling, heart stopping action with a brief moment of relief to twist a mystery into your brain.

This the 16th Murder Women's Club book co-written with Maxine Paetro is as good as the first and every bit as entertaining. It follows a group of professional women that have become friends while solving murders and foiling evil plots together. Lindsay the Detective, Claire the Medical Examiner, Yuki the Lawyer and Cindy the Reporter all collaborate (or not!) to unravel and expose multiple surprising threads of revenge and betrayal. I loved the interaction between the women as it rings true for me and the mystery brilliantly strings you along.

James Patterson and his women never disappoint!
~Gillian, Australia Fair QBD

Say hello to Miss Lily’s Lovely Ladies

I have long been a fan of Jackie French's kids & YA fiction so I was looking forward to this- her first adult fiction title. I was not disappointed!

Jackie writes beautifully so it's very easy to put yourself in the world of Sophie Higgs, young Colonial heiress, who has been sent away to England to be "finished" at the home of Miss Lily. Sophie's father knows that there is a wider world outside Australia for his intelligent & headstrong daughter and he hopes that she may be exposed to more eligible gentleman than those at home. Sophie must learn to curb her outspoken tendencies and learn all about her feminine wiles under the tutelage of the kind but strict Miss Lily. But who really is Miss Lily?

Sophie and her new friends are presented in the last 'season' before the start of The Great War. How can all they've learnt now be put to good use in helping the war effort at a time when friends are now enemies?

This book has it all- romance, history, espionage and ultimately, mystery. We do get the answer to who Miss Lily is, but there is more to come in French's planned sequels. A satisfying & solid read of which I now can't wait for more! Fans of Downtown Abbey, Julian Fellowes, Fiona Mcintosh and other historical fiction will enjoy Miss Lily's Lovely Ladies.

-Susan, QBD Eastland

Reviewsday: The Last Showman

An excellent Aussie autobiographical yarn of Fred Brophy and his boxing tent, an old institution banned almost everywhere in the western world ... as well as in Victoria and New South Wales here (Fred will often wish visitors from these two states a happy ‘Welcome to Australia!’). As a boxer, the tent-boxing idea has fascinated me for a while, particularly how important it is for someone like Fred to be able to match up the volunteers with his fighters, sell the judgements on the contests to the crowd so that he makes a dollar and doesn’t cause a riot, and also for the fighters to out-fight their opponents ... but not by too much, so they’ll be welcome back next time.

Sue Williams does an excellent job of appearing to be absolutely absent from the text; Fred’s laconic humour and often contradictory recollections and ideas-on-life come through just as though he was sitting next to you at a bar in Birdsville over a XXXX beer. Deliciously, what is left out or brushed over is often where you think the meat of the story may be, but there’s still enough in there to marvel at and tickle your funny bone. There’s a bit of repetition and a few editorial misses here and there, but a good unpretentious read about a larrikin ‘old mate’.

-Jeremy, Doncaster QBD