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Reviewsday: The Survivors by Kate Furnivall

The Survivors was one of the most complex, gripping historical thrillers I have read. This is the first novel I have read of Kate Furnivall's, and I was thoroughly engrossed from the first page.

Following a story line not common of novels set in the Second World War, The Survivors is not a story of concentration camps or war scenes, but the aftermath of war and the long lasting effects on civilians who have lost everything. The shadow of war lingers heavily over the characters of this novel. Klara and her daughter Alicja suffered through a long and almost deathly journey to get to the Graufeld Displaced Persons Camp after being reunited after the war. After losing Klara's hubsand, Alicja's father during the war, their home was bombed, leaving them with nothing. Far from finding the safety and security they expect at the camp, Klara discovers that a mysterious figure from her past has arrived at the camp, and she fears for both her life and her daughters'.
Who is this man, and what events of her past have led her to fear him so much? And what did Klara do to fear his revenge?

The Survivors shows the depths of a mother's love, and the lengths she will go to in order to protect her child. A story of love and loss, of hope and of despair, it will keep you hooked from the first page. It kept me on the edge of my seat through the intense war scenes, the thrilling journey to freedom, and a fight for survival. The twist at the end had tears streaming down my face, and I wanted to read this book all over again.

I highly recommend The Survivors for fans of The Tattooist of Auschwitz, The Love That I Have, and The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas, or just for any fans of well written and researched historical fiction.

~ Coreena, QBD Morayfield

Reviewsday: Every Breath by Nicholas Sparks

This October indulge in an unforgettable tale of enduring love from master storyteller Nicholas Sparks.

Nicholas Sparks has done it again. A story of love, hope, sacrifice and miracles set in a beautiful part of the world. As a reader you can't help but fall in love with the characters and with Sunset Beach.

Tru Walls travels from Zimbabwe to North Carolina to meet his biological father. It is here on the peaceful, quiet, autumnal shores of Sunset Beach that he meets Hope Anderson. The five days Tru and Hope spend together forever changes the course of their lives.

A story of what-ifs, that will demand you question if you believe in fate and destiny. A moving, heart-warming and simultaneously gut-wrenching story from the master of romance and heartache. I feel the need to tell the world about this book, so that others can experience it's beauty.

~ Rosie, Carousel QBD

Reviewsday: Armada by Ernest Cline

Pew Pew Pew!!!

Hurry reader we must find shelter from the laser fire….

Phew…that was close!

You might be wondering where these lasers are coming from…well perhaps it’s time to read Armada by Ernest Cline to find out! Cline’s second novel after his smash release Ready Player One will have you dodging destruction in this alien-infested sci-fi tale. Follow Zack Lightman as he begins to uncover the unsettling truth behind a government cover-up to protect the world from annihilation at the hands of the Europeans…I mean Europans, who’ve made it their sole purpose to destroy Earth and all its inhabitants.

A story fit for teenagers and young adults Armada pays homage to Cline’s personal favourite pop culture references and sources such as those created by the famous sci-fi directors Stephen Spielberg and Stanley Kubrick. Set your phasers to kill reader and pray to god you aim is better than a Stormtrooper's - this is going to be a fight you won’t soon forget.

~Liam, Carousel QBD

Reviewsday: Impostors by Scott Westerfeld

Master storyteller Scott Westerfeld returns with a brilliant new series set in the world of his bestselling Uglies series.

The first thing that had me hooked with this novel was how refreshing it was to be back in Tally Youngblood’s universe. I somehow skipped over this little fact – which is handily supplied in the blurb, who knew? - due to my uncontainable excitement over the novel's existence. Diving headfirst back into it all these years later was like coming home.

As I’m sure we all know at this point Westerfeld writes some mind-blowing characters, but Frey has knocked everyone else off their pedestal and claimed her rightful place as my favourite. Despite basically being a walking, talking, ticking time bomb, she’s an insanely complex character with an unexpected vulnerability to her that had me firmly in her corner from the first chapter.

Westerfeld’s world building is superbly on point as always and the changes wrought by Tally’s hand in the Uglies series (which I wholeheartedly recommend reading if you haven’t already!) essentially lay the foundation for the plot of Impostors. I won’t say too much because untangling Westerfeld's intricate web is an experience not to be missed, but there are enough heavy smatterings of action, intrigue and good ole plot twists to keep you engrossed until the last page. With a cliff-hanger ending that is so deviously twisted I barely registered how shocked I was because I was so damn impressed, Impostors is not a novel to be missed.

~ Karen, Tweed Heads QBD

 

About the book: 

Frey was raised to take a bullet.

She's the body double for her twin sister Rafia - the precious heir of the first family of Shreve - and her existence is a closely guarded secret. So while Rafi was schooled in poise and diplomacy, Frey was drilled in weapons and combat. Her purpose: to protect her sister from their tyrannical father's many enemies.

When Frey is sent in Rafi's place as collateral in a precarious business deal, she becomes the perfect impostor - as elegant and charming as her sister. But Col Palafox, the son of a rival leader, is getting close enough to spot the killer inside her. As layers of deceit peel away, can Frey become her own person, and risk everything in a rebellion?

Reviewsday: Strange The Dreamer by Laini Taylor

Strange the Dreamer transports you into a world filled with Gods and monsters. Lazlo Strange, an orphan boy, struggled against the rigid rules and requirements of being raised by monks. Lazlo’s only retreat is his dream to one day discover the long lost magical city of Weep. As Lazlo grows older his obsession with Weep only becomes stronger. Until one fateful day when citizens of Weep suddenly arrive into town.

This book instantly became one of my favourites. It just has everything a great fantasy novel should have. The world building is fantastic and the imagery created by the lyrical writing style of Taylor easily immerses you into the world of Lazlo Strange. Like all great fantasy books, Strange the Dreamer allows you to observe relevant issues and ideas for today through the lens of the fantastical. Taylor thoughtfully explores the ideas of forgiveness, racism and how trauma carries through generations.

Books like this are a rare find and I am eagerly awaiting the next one Muse of Nightmares which is due to come out in October 2018.

~ Orah, QBD Chadstone