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QBD Recommends: The Pearl Thief by Fiona McIntosh 

 

Most booklovers who have spent any time in an Australian bookstore are probably familiar with the name Fiona McIntosh. One of Australia’s most prolific writers, Fiona has written over thirty books across a wide range of genres, including crime, fantasy, and children’s literature. Arguably though, it is her historical fiction for which she is most well known, and keeps her place as one of Australia’s best-selling authors.

And it is her historical fiction that recently brought the Sussex-born author all the way from her home in South Australia, to Penrith, NSW – to discuss her new novel, QBD’s current Book of the Month, The Pearl Thief.

Having just finished reading The Pearl Thief myself, I can personally tell you: This book is extraordinary! The Pearl Thief is the type of book that will keep you up at night, reading into the early hours of the morning, because you just can’t put the book down! (An experience I haven’t had with a book in years, but with The Pearl Thief, sleep was not an option!)

But what did Fiona McIntosh have to say about her latest novel?

The evening was hosted by Penrith City Library on Thursday, 15th November. Readers of all ages had come out to fill the Library’s Lower Lounge. Around the room, copies of The Pearl Thief were tucked under arms, or kept open on laps, as readers continued to flip through the pages with an insatiable need.

Fiona McIntosh took to the podium, decked out in tribute to the titular pearls. Pearl necklace, pearl bracelet, pearl earrings. Her entire discussion was presented with her unmistakeable, vivacious energy and passion for storytelling.

But let’s start with the most important question. Why should readers read The Pearl Thief?

Fiona McIntosh described this book as “a book of firsts”, admitting that usually, when she writes, she is never aware if her writing is good or not. But when it came to The Pearl Thief, things were different.

“Usually, I just write, and I’ve got no sense of ‘Is this good? Is this bad? Is this ordinary? Is this fabulous?’

“But as I was writing this one, I knew… it was fabulous!”

For the first time, Fiona knew, what she was writing was not only tremendously special, but she was hitting all the right notes. Her storytelling, her setting, her characters, her words – all combining to create magic!

So where did this magic begin? What was the origin of the idea for The Pearl Thief?

When it comes to writing her stories, Fiona attests, she always starts with place. Where is the story set? So when she set out to write what would become The Pearl Thief, she asked herself, “Where would my readers like me to take them next?” The answer: Prague.

This choice of setting then provided the catalyst for the story to follow. Once Fiona had decided on Prague, she began to think about the city’s history, and how the German occupation of Czechoslovakia became a trigger for World War Two.

So, Fiona had her setting, and her timeline. Prague, 1930’s/1940’s. Now she needed a character. She knew immediately that she wanted this character to be a survivor. Enter, Severine Kassel.

“She arrived, and tapped me on the shoulder, and she was complete. It was the first time… that a character had arrived into my life and said ‘Here I am! I’m ready to go!’”

Who is Severine Kassel?

When Severine Kassel arrived as a character in Fiona’s mind, she knew she was a survivor. But what was her story? From her podium at Penrith Library, Fiona described how she knew she wanted this character to be running from something, until something came along in her life, and forced her to turn around.

“And that’s why on the front cover of the book, she’s turning. Because I wanted her to turn around and face all the darkness, and all the pain.”

But what was it that was going to set Severine’s story in motion? Fiona came up with the idea of a glorious, family heirloom of Byzantine pearls. These pearls would then be stolen from Severine, only for her to stumble across them again, twenty years later.

“And when she sees them, having reinvented her life over those twenty years, and glued herself together, all of her pain, and all of her anger is going to be unleased, when she sees these pearls again and decides the only way she can go forward, the only way she can live her life properly, is to go and hunt down the man she holds responsible for all of her pain.”

“That’s what the story became. This is her turning around to say “I’m no longer running from you, I’m coming for you.”

The writing process behind The Pearl Thief

Now Fiona had told us all about the story, and the origins of The Pearl Thief, it was time for her to share some inside tips on the writing process. When it comes to her historical fiction, Fiona lists research and travel as two of the most important ways to create a “bubble of believability around the reader”. When writing a novel like The Pearl Thief, Fiona always travels to the place where her story is set, to walk where her characters will walk.

“I go and find all these places… and then I can weave them into the story with great authenticity… Every place you read about in the story, I’ve been to, and I’ve put my feet there.”

To make sure her travels are well informed, Fiona hires a personal tour guide, and allows them to teach her all about the history, and people of the place she has chosen to set her story. But she never takes notes for her research.

“Everything I do is based on feeling... When I’m researching, I’m never taking notes, I’m just looking, and absorbing, and a bit like osmosis, whatever gets through, sticks, and stays with me. And then the writing is done all on pure emotion.”

Here, Fiona shared her most poignant moment in researching the Prague setting of The Pearl Thief. The moment came when she asked her guide to show her the forests that lay beyond Prague. At this point, Fiona knew, something bad was going to happen to her character here, but she needed to see it for herself. To find this place, and walk in her character’s shoes. To feel what her character would feel. So her guide drove her out, and around the forests, until Fiona asked her to stop. Then, she hopped out of the car, and walked down the wooded lane alone, listening to the sounds of the few birds, and the falling autumn leaves.

“The leaves were falling by the hundred, on top of me. It was like confetti. And I could just hear this flutter. And it was the most beautiful sound, but the most chilling sound. And I began to cry, and I knew I’d found the spot. I thought, ‘this is where it’s going to happen. This is where Severine is going to walk.”

When you read The Pearl Thief, it’s easy to see why this setting brought Fiona to tears. The forests became the scene of Severine’s most traumatic moment. A moment that turns her life upside-down, robbing her of far more than her family pearls. A moment that McIntosh has written to absolute, horrific perfection. This is the moment that will stick with you, long after you’ve read it. This is Fiona McIntosh at her best, and absolutely why you should be reading this incredibly powerful story.

So make sure you head to your nearest QBD store, and pick up a copy of The Pearl Thief today!

~Alyssa, QBD Penrith.

Hurstville’s Hot Reads

Today our Hurstville team give us the low-down on their favourite and latest reads!

Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli:

If you're after a cute book that will leave you feeling all warm and fuzzy, then look no further! Simon, a teenage boy, is too afraid to come out to his friends and family, but this doesn't stop him having an anonymous pen pal - and it's someone who goes to his school. This pen pal knows everything about Simon, including, and especially, his sexuality. In an enthralling read, Simon has to deal with how to come out to friends and family, how to deal with his crush on the cute boy in his class, and trying to figure out who his pen pal is. It's adorable and it's just plain fun. With summer and the holidays coming up, it's the perfect book to have with you at the beach or by the pool. -Mersini

Looking for Alaska by John Green:

In honour of John Green’s first novel in 6 years, Turtles All the Way Down, being released today I have decided to review Looking for Alaska which is my all-time favourite book.
Looking for Alaska is about 3 friends whose lives are so transformed by a certain experience that they now only see time as ‘before’ and ‘after’ that event.
Before: Miles “Pudge” Halter is sick of his boring, predictable life so he attends Culver Creek boarding school in Alabama to seek his “Great Perhaps” and get more out of life. There he meets Alaska Young and Chip “The Colonel” Martin. Together they go on a whirlwind of adventures.
After: Nothing is ever the same.

This book is very memorable with a powerful impact. I read it many years ago and I’m still recommending it to a lot people. It’s the first book where the plot twist just completely shocked me. This fantastic coming of age novel that doesn’t have a predictable happily ever after ending is a must read! - Bel

I'll Give You The Sun by Jandy Nelson:

I’ll Give You The Sun is a captivating story told from the alternating perspectives of twin siblings. This novel follows Noah and Jude as they take us through the tragedies that tore them apart and the complications of family and friendship. Filled with heartbreak, wisdom, and joy, this story is very hard to put down. While the writing style is different to the ‘norm’, I really think that this may be what makes the story so intriguing. Nelson has written an amazing story that is definitely worth a read! - Lara

Force of Nature by Jane Harper:

I thought Jane Harper's debut novel The Dry was fantastic but Force of Nature has definitely topped it!

What has happened to Alice Russell?
Five women reluctantly pick up their backpacks and start walking along the muddy track. Only four come out the other side.
The hike through the rugged Giralang Ranges is meant to take the office colleagues out of their air-conditioned comfort zone and teach resilience and team building. At least that is what the corporate retreat website advertises.

Federal Police Agent Aaron Falk has a particularly keen interest in the whereabouts of the missing bushwalker. Alice Russell is the whistleblower in his latest case. She knows all the secrets: about the company she works for and the people she works with.

Far from the hike encouraging teamwork, the women tell Falk a tale of violence and disintegrating trust. And as he delves into the disappearance, it seems some dangers run far deeper than anyone knew.

Absolutely mind blowing unput-a-downable mystery thriller from one of our home grown authors,I highly recommend Force of Nature to anyone who listens! - Sal

Tune In, Tune Out

Stuck in TV limbo while waiting for the new season of your favourite show? Or, even worse, has the series finale come and gone and now you're at a loss? Never fear! We've got your next read all sorted – based on your favourite TV show!

9780141037448Love Downton Abbey? Try Love in a Cold Climate by Nancy Mitford.
“Love indeed - whoever invented love ought to be shot.”
Love in a Cold Climate is filled with drama, glittering wit, and a cast of wonderfully eccentric characters. Be transported back to 1930s Britain, where the aristocratic Montdore family is stubbornly self-assured of their own superiority, and are in for the shock of their lives.

rsz_9781743317884Love Better Call Saul? Try The Lincoln Lawyer by Michael Connelly
“You're a sleazy defense lawyer with two ex-wifes and an eight-year-old daughter and we all love you.”
Mickey Haller is a lawyer who doesn't waste time worrying if his clients are innocent or guilty. For him, the law is a matter of manipulation and negotiation, and he's not too picky where the paycheck is coming from. The Lincoln Lawyer is impossible to put down, with a cast of likeable characters and a gripping thrill-ride of a plot.

revolutionary-roadLove Mad Men? Try Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates
"Everything is selling. Nothing happens in this world, nothing comes into this world, until somebody makes a sale."
Set in the American 'Golden Age' of 1955, Revolutionary Road follows the pursuits of a glamorous young couple who move to suburbia with their young children, and assume that greatness is just around the corner. Just like Mad Men, be prepared for characters who enjoy love affairs, whiskey drinking, cigarette smoking, and fast talking.

9780552772761Love The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt? Try Remember Me? by Sophie Kinsella
"Jeez Louise. I know why rich people are so thin: it's from trekking around their humongous houses the whole time."
Have you ever wished you would suddenly wake up one day and your whole life will have sorted itself out? That's what happened to Lexi: one minute, she's 25 and struggling through life and love, the next minute, she's waking up in a hospital bed, three years later, to find out she's got her dream job and is married to a millionaire! In between watching her trying to navigate her new life and being bombarded with revelations of the events of the past three years, we get treated to hilarious gems like watching her devastation at the break-up of Brad Pitt and Jennifer Aniston, and her excitement at a new Harry Potter novel. This novel is funny, warm, and uplifting.