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Introducing: Bridge of Clay by Markus Zusak

It was in 2005 that Markus Zusak's 'The Book Thief' first hit shelves. Death’s narration of Liesel Meminger’s love affair with books in Nazi Germany remains an international bestseller and modern classic beloved by millions. Now he is back with a new gripping page turner -  Bridge of Clay!

Bridge of Clay is about a boy who is caught in the current – of destroying everything he has, to become all he needs to be. He’s a boy in search of greatness, as a cure for memory and tragedy. Clay Dunbar builds a bridge to save his family, but also to save himself. It’s an attempt to transcend humanness, to make a single, glorious moment: A miracle and nothing less.

Started when he was a teenager, Bridge of Clay has been many years in the making for Markus Zusak ; “Thirteen years is probably long enough between books, and I quit this one so many times …The thing is, I also knew I could never quite give it up completely. People would say, ‘Just write one of your other ideas,’ but that was the thing – there were no other ideas. Everything was going into this. Now I can finally say I love it, but not in a way of thinking it’s good, or great; it isn’t. It’s itself – and if nothing else, I know it’s big-hearted. It’s a boy in search of a miracle, and that’s how I feel about finishing it. Every book we write means something to us, but sometimes a book means everything – and Bridge of Clay, for me is that latter type: the book you have to fight for, but is all the more rewarding.

Bridge of Clay will be published by Pan Macmillan Australia on the 9th of October 2018.

Preorder your copy in store or online here: Bridge Of Clay

Read a sample chapter: Growing Up The Dunbar Way

All quotes and descriptions have been obtained from media releases authored by Pan Macmillan Australia

About the author:

Markus Zusak is the author of five books, including the international bestseller, The Book Thief, which spent more than a decade on the New York Timesbestseller list, and is translated into more than forty languages – establishing Zusak as one of the most successful authors to come out of Australia.

His books have been awarded numerous honours ranging from literary prizes to readers choice awards to prizes voted on by booksellers. In 2013, The Book Thief was adapted to film, starring Academy Award winner Geoffrey Rush, Emily Watson, and Sophie Nelisse (as Liesel Meminger). 

Zusak’s much-anticipated new novel, Bridge of Clay, is set for release in October 2018 in the USA, the UK and Australia, with foreign translations to follow.

Markus Zusak grew up in Sydney, Australia, and still lives there with his wife and two children.

Book-A-Like: All The Light We Cannot See & The Book Thief

If you like The Book Thief by Markus Zusak, you’ll love All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr! Both novels are stunningly poetic creations by authors who approach the concept of war in similar (yet uniquely striking) ways. Both Zusak and Doerr have managed to expertly weave the dualities of war in a heart-wrenching exploration of innocence, grief, hatred, hope, passion, fear and courage. I can guarantee that both of these books will stay with you long after you turn the final page.

- Jess, Strathpine QBD

 

All The Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr:

When Marie Laure goes blind, aged six, her father builds her a model of their Paris neighborhood, so she can memorize it with her fingers and then navigate the real streets. But when the Germans occupy Paris, father and daughter flee to Saint-Malo on the Brittany coast, where Marie-Laure's agoraphobic great uncle lives in a tall, narrow house by the sea wall.

In another world in Germany, an orphan boy, Werner, is enchanted by a crude radio. He becomes a master at building and fixing radios, a talent ultimately makes him a highly specialized tracker of the Resistance. Werner travels through the heart of Hitler Youth to the far-flung outskirts of Russia, and finally into Saint-Malo, where his path converges with Marie-Laure. Deftly interweaving the lives of Marie-Laure and Werner, Doerr illuminates the ways, against all odds, people try to be good to one another.

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak:

It is 1939. Nazi Germany. The country is holding its breath. Death has never been busier, and will become busier still. By her brother's graveside, Liesel's life is changed when she picks up a single object, partially hidden in the snow. It is The Gravedigger's Handbook, left there by accident, and it is her first act of book thievery. So begins a love affair with books and words, as Liesel, with the help of her accordion-playing foster father, learns to read. Soon she is stealing books from Nazi book-burnings, the mayor's wife's library, wherever there are books to be found. But these are dangerous times.

When Liesel's foster family hides a Jewish fist-fighter in their basement, Liesel's world is both opened up, and closed down. The Book Thief is a story about the power of words to make worlds.

QBD Reviews: The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

the-book-thief

The Book Thief is hands down one of the greatest books I have ever read. Many people will remember the movie, which was released in 2013 however; the book portrays realism and heart-wrenching warmth that is unable to be captured on screen. Set in late 1930s Germany, the book is founded on the undertones of the impending war, creating a certain awareness of imminent tragedy, which breeds tension in the mind of the reader.

The Book Thief follows the life of Liesel Meminger as she attempts to deal with change, understanding and loss. The novel is written from the unique perspective of Death. Despite this, Death's "Amiable. Agreeable. Affable. And that's only the A's" nature makes the reader fall into the world through his narrative frame and cling tightly to every detail. Zusak's incredible talent for imagery makes the book come alive with colour, sounds and texture which enhances the reading experience, creating a deeper connection to each character and the world they live in. The narrator frames the characters to be cherished and loved; my particular favourites are the loveable best friend Rudy and the kind foster father Hans who both deeply care for Liesel and help her to grow. Overall the book will have you turning every page just to see what happens next; and believe me, you will not be expecting it. It makes a great Christmas gift for anyone looking for a story with depth, real emotion and fantastic writing.

Favourite quote of the book: "I wanted to explain that I am constantly overestimating and underestimating the human race-that rarely do I ever simply estimate it. I wanted to ask her how the same thing could be so ugly and so glorious, and its words and stories so damning and brilliant.”

~Tori, QBD Miranda