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Reviewsday: Nevermoor by Jessica Townsend

 

Step boldly into a Wundrous new world of magic with Nevermoor!

"Nevermoor is the first book in a magical new series and is set to become one of the biggest children's books of the year. The story is at times reminiscent of Harry Potter, The Hunger Games, A Series of Unfortunate Events and more recently A Most Magical Girl. Despite these likenesses, Nevermoor is wonderfully original and captivating read for all ages.

Morrigan Crow is a true underdog; a cursed child shunned by all, including her family. An extraordinary rescuer comes to her aid and thus launches Morrigan and us as readers headlong into a 'Wundrous' new world where she must remain long enough to discover her awesome true calling. A secret society, a magical hotel, a vampire dwarf and a giant talking Magnificat are just a few enchanting elements of this riveting series that will leave you wanting more." - Nola, QBD Fountain Gate

Nevermoor is available in store and online now.

Can't wait to get started? Read an excerpt here.

Meet Our October Book of The Month!

Jane Harper's second novel, Force of Nature, featuring Federal Police Agent Aaron Falk is a gripping crime thriller that will have you on the edge of your seat!
And luckily, it's our October Book of the Month! But we won't gush on...we'll let Jane tell you all about the book herself:

Here's what our teams around Australia are saying:

Following the phenomenal debut of her first novel, 'The Dry', Jane Harper returns with the equally well-written and suspenseful, 'Force of Nature'. Harper successfully combines the whodunit prowess of Agatha Christie with the relentlessness of the Australian Bush. 'Force of Nature' provides a fast-paced read that uses all it's characters to deliver a layered and complex example of crime-fiction. 4.5 stars. - T.S., Innaloo QBD

I loved it! Another spellbinding thriller full of suspense from Jane Harper, just like her debut novel The Dry.
Alice Russell goes missing during a team building exercise in rugged bushland, with Aaron Falk called into help solve the mystery once again. A page turner from the beginning, it kept pace but was a bit anti-climatic at the end. I'm patiently awaiting her next novel! 4 stars. - R.D., Strathpine QBD

Addictive and atmospheric, Force of Nature is suspenseful in a way you simply have to experience for yourself. Jane Harper effortlessly captures a sense of place, highlighting the dangers of the Australian bush as five women try to navigate their way out..and only four return. With a fine line between the truth and lies, and a mini-cliffhanger at the end of each chapter - I could not put it down! 4.5 stars. - E.A., Miranda QBD

Harper lives up to the hype in her highly anticipated sequel, Force of Nature. The characters, plot, and realistic setting are as superb and well-crafted as they were in her award-winning debut The Dry. I recommend this book to anyone that enjoyed Big Little Lies—the book, or the television show—anyone who read and enjoyed The Dry, and all lovers of a good-old-fashioned 'whodunit' story. 5 stars. - T.H., Browns Plains QBD

Jane Harper impresses her ever-widening readership again with this corporate-crime thriller which develops the Australian landscape into a character just as dark, secretive and brooding as the others. Police procedural continues to get its Harper makeover, Patricia Cornwell meets Liane Moriarty with Fiona Palmer standing nearby in a pair of jeans. 3.5 stars. - J.D., Doncaster QBD

Cosy up with QBD Carindale’s must-reads!

 

Our Carindale team have put together a great selection of their favourite reads for you to cuddle up with in the air-con this Summer!

 

The Beach Cafe by Lucy Diamond:

A gorgeous novel about love and life; family and tragedy and ultimately finding your place in the world. Perfect for fans of Sophie Kinsella, Jill Mansell and Giovanna Fletcher. - Emily (Store Manager)

The Dry by Jane Harper:

An awesome murder mystery, set in a rural town in Australia. Full of twists and turns and deep dark secrets, this is one book that is impossible to put down. Read it before seeing the movie! - Tia

The Beach by Alex Garland:

The Beach follows Richard, a gap-year student who has embarked on a trip to Vietnam that will change his perception on day to day life. The Beach is a dark but riveting adventure that really gets you thinking about the price of paradise. This was made into a movie starring Leonardo Dicaprio. - Nick

Leading by Alex Ferguson:

A no-nonsense and insightful look into the life of a great sporting leader of our time. This book draws many similarities to how Fergie's leadership principals can be adapted in other businesses and the importance of a strong work ethic. A fantastic read for Manchester United supporters and the neutral fan alike. It's hard to argue with the results Fergie has produced. -Charles

Northern Lights by Nora Roberts:

A romantic mystery that has it all; A dark hero, a tough independent female, breathtaking description of Alaska and a criminal investigation with lots of danger. Put it all together and you have a fast paced intense read which will keep you turning pages to the end. - Gina

Trainspotting by Irvine Welsh:

This book gives stark, raw insight into the lives of Scotland's undesirables. An incredible, fast paced read that explores the battle between addiction and the will to live. - Kara

Vampire Academy by Richelle Mead:

When I first started reading Vampire Academy, I was worried it would be the typical vampire/werewolf love story but thankfully it wasn't. Compared to other paranormal authors, Richelle Mead doesn't focus on the romance between characters so much that the plot line gets lost in between. The character development is one of the amazing factors of this series along with hilarious scenes. I would definitely recommend it for anyone who wants to get away from focused love triangles without a story. - Cassandra

Reviewsday: The Dark Lake by Sarah Bailey

Let me start by saying how much I enjoy reading local Australian content novels. There's nothing wrong with overseas titles but an Aussie title always draws me deeper in. It's not the sometimes over-the-top outback dramas I'm talking about (which I do love!) but the ordinary settings and situations. Things like the seasons being the right way around; the sounds; the localities and the references to society, events & culture. Even Australian crime seems a little bit more believable...

Gemma is a detective in the same regional town that she grew up in. Sometimes that can be beneficial to investigations but at others it can all get just a bit too close to home & personal. This is one such case. The victim is a teacher at the local high school, the same school Gemma attended ten years back- with Rose as one of her classmates. There was some type of connection between the two back then but Gemma swears that her personal feelings will not effect her impartiality to the investigation. Rose appears to have been well liked so who could be responsible for her death? Is it random or personal?

The investigation drags along like the long, hot days of pre-Christmas summer. For Gemma, the case opens up old wounds that she tries to keep hidden from her partners- work & life , but even here the lines are blurred. Gemma is a great detective but will this be the case that breaks her?

A solid debut from Sarah Bailey and one that I really liked.

~ Susan, Eastlands QBD

Reviewsday: Joelle Charbonneau’s Dividing Eden

Having read Joelle Charbonneau's Testing series (which has a Hunger Games-esque vibe to it for all of you dystopian novel lovers!), I think I can safely say I was jumping up and down out of excitement when Dividing Eden popped up on my radar.

Reminiscent of The Crown's Game by Evelyn Skye, Dividing Eden tells the tale of twin royals, Carys and Andreus, pitted against each other in a battle for the crown after a disastrous accident leaves them with equal claim to the throne. Faced with a power hungry council watching their every move and faceless enemies stirring up trouble, the twins can only do what they've been doing their entire lives – stick together, watch each other's backs and, above all, protect the secret that's been haunting them since birth.

The novel was intriguing from the get go but I felt that Carys definitely emerges as the stronger lead throughout the book with Andreus' story taking a surprising turn that, whilst being beneficial to the plot line, was still a little tough to read through (if you find yourself shaking the book in frustration and wailing “Noooo!”, don't say I didn't warn you!). There a quite a few shady characters that appear in and around the castle which left me questioning almost everyone's motives. Even after finishing the book, I'm still suspicious as to who is really on which side.

Dividing Eden is truly an engrossing read – clear your calendar because you won't want to put it down until you've worked your way through all of the secrets, lies and manipulative madness that await you.