You won’t be able to put these books down!

 

Great literature you can't put down, as reviewed by our Tweed Heads Team!

 

Two Brothers by Ben Elton:

Historical fiction doesn't get better than this! Two Brothers is a fascinating blend of the horrors of war and the infallible strength of family ties. Following the story of two young boys, brothers in all but blood, navigating their way through life in Nazi Germany, this novel is packed with many twists and turns but no mystery is as prominent as the question that hangs over you the entire novel – which brother has survived the war to tell their tale? Perfect for fans of The Book Thief, Two Brothers is a rich, immersive read that will linger in your mind long after you finish it – Karen, Store Manager

The One Who Got Away by Caroline Overington:

A psychological thriller with unsettling twists and turns throughout. A page turner leaving you questioning many aspects of the characters. Caroline Overington has brought her characters to life highlighting peoples' hidden agendas and motivations for the things they say and do. What lengths would you go to to have the life that you have always dreamt of? The author has managed to create diverse characters evoking emotion from the reader, however, as readers, are we gunning for the right person? Which characters do you or should you believe, who can you trust and who is really to blame? Lies, deceipt and betrayal....but who is really the villain in manipulating the situation for their own gain? I did not anticipate the ending and you are left asking so many questions! - Sheridan

The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas by John Boyne:

The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas is a novel that provides the reader with an exclusive outlook on how ignorance and violence affect innocent people. Bruno an eight year old boy, the son of a Nazi commandant of world war II, is forced to move to a new home with his family on a property only miles away from a Jewish concentration camp. Bruno is limited to exploration at his new home and is forbidden to leave the grounds of the front court yard. He disobeys his parents and decides to explore the new place he calls home and comes across a barbed wire fence, where he meets a young boy Shmuel. Shmuel; captive to Bruno's father's inhuman acts; loses his father inside the camp and becomes worried he will never see him again. Bruno feels for Shmuel and decides he will crawl under the wire to help him find his father. Through the eyes of an eight-year-old boy readers observe a forbidden friendship. Bruno and Shmuel shed light on the brutality, senselessness and devastating consequences of war from an unusual point of view. Together their tragic journey helps recall the millions of innocent victims of the Holocaust. - Ashley

Rivers of London by Ben Aaronovitch:

I have been reading Rivers of London by Ben Aaronovitch, and I was captivated from the first page. By skilfully combining the real and fantastical worlds, Aaronovitch has created a unique sector of the London police force that is the vehicle for Peter Grant's strange, quirky, and often times dangerous adventures as a rookie policeman. Rivers of London is only the first book in Peter Grant series, and it is a great book for those who enjoy crime and fantasy. I personally can't wait to dive further into the world Aaronovitch has created - Bridie

The Dry by Jane Harper:

Australian Journalist Jane Harper's crime novel The Dry could be set in any drought stricken, small rural town in Australia. A tragic accident sees protagonist Federal Agent Ryan Faulk reluctantly returning to his childhood home town after a long absence. Are things what they seem? Will he stay to find out? Cleverly narrated, exploring the complex relationships within a small fractured community the plot unfolds painting a picture of a town and its inhabitants as desolate as the unchanging landscape. Keeping you turning the pages until the last and satisfying conclusion. - Raychel

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee:

To Kill a Mockingbird is a beautifully written novel told from the perspective of Scout, the young daughter of lawyer Atticus Finch. Set during the Great Depression in the fictional town of Maycomb, Alabama, Scout and her older brother Jem are quickly pushed into the public spotlight when their farther is given a morally challenging court case. In charge of representing a black man for the alleged rape of a white girl Atticus has no choice but to expose his children to the racism and prejudice that thickly veil the town, topics they themselves don't fully understand - Emma

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