QBD Reviews: The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

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The Book Thief is hands down one of the greatest books I have ever read. Many people will remember the movie, which was released in 2013 however; the book portrays realism and heart-wrenching warmth that is unable to be captured on screen. Set in late 1930s Germany, the book is founded on the undertones of the impending war, creating a certain awareness of imminent tragedy, which breeds tension in the mind of the reader.

The Book Thief follows the life of Liesel Meminger as she attempts to deal with change, understanding and loss. The novel is written from the unique perspective of Death. Despite this, Death's "Amiable. Agreeable. Affable. And that's only the A's" nature makes the reader fall into the world through his narrative frame and cling tightly to every detail. Zusak's incredible talent for imagery makes the book come alive with colour, sounds and texture which enhances the reading experience, creating a deeper connection to each character and the world they live in. The narrator frames the characters to be cherished and loved; my particular favourites are the loveable best friend Rudy and the kind foster father Hans who both deeply care for Liesel and help her to grow. Overall the book will have you turning every page just to see what happens next; and believe me, you will not be expecting it. It makes a great Christmas gift for anyone looking for a story with depth, real emotion and fantastic writing.

Favourite quote of the book: "I wanted to explain that I am constantly overestimating and underestimating the human race-that rarely do I ever simply estimate it. I wanted to ask her how the same thing could be so ugly and so glorious, and its words and stories so damning and brilliant.”

~Tori, QBD Miranda